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Question in: Nanotechnology

Other types of molecular bonds?

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Are ionic bonds the only types that should be considered for the commercial application of molecular conjunction?

Chemical Bonding
Industrial Chemistry
Ionic Liquids
David Sundin
12 days ago

5 answers

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'conjunction, conjugate, conjugation' are textbook definitions. However, conjunction/conjugation is nowadays used for the linking of i.e. biomolecule and drug or dye. These are covalently linked and not ionic.

Oskar Middel
12 days ago
And these are commercially attractive - Oskar 12 days ago
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Molecular Conjugation nowadays mostly applies to covalently attach/link drug or fluorophores (dyes) to a protein or biomolecule (biopolymer) and this is a chemical (or photo chemical) process.

Abhijit Saha
12 days ago
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David,

What we have here first are definition issues.

What exactly do you mean by molecular conjunction? The oldest traditional definition is p orbital overlap allowing free electron flow, such as on conjugated double bonds in dienes. Sadly, different disciplines use highly varied definition and that is certainly not helpful to you.

So, what is your definition and application, generally?

Electron flow and density are at the heart of how all atoms interacting as molecules through to loose association define matter. Ionic bonds are themselves highly varied. All have "industrial application" so im aftaid we need a bit more information to cogently reply and likely be helpful!

Adam Malofsky, PhD
12 days ago
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David - Looking at your background, I'll assume for the moment we are talking about flyids and their behavior, especially in a nanoscale. At the truly moleculare scale, say 1 to 100 atoms, or molecular or molecular regions within one moldcule or across them, weird stuff happens in interstitial spaces between say two distinct other "materials" like say two alligned plates of metal or plastic or ceramic a hundred to a thousand angstroms apart. Chemical bonds, ionic through associative, like with Van Der Wals forces, behave differently that when in the true bulk phase say against a single surface. The laws of physics are the same but their expression changes in these unique situations, much the same way a catalyst surface can preform some magic like by an enzyme, a zeolite pore and so on.

To that end, any kind of bond can become industrially applied, especially within nanotechnology. The question then becomes what do you consider nanotechnology? Many applications in nano approach these dimensions allowing use of any bond to create affect while many simply are too larhe scale moldcularly and simply do not afford any affect.

Adam Malofsky, PhD
12 days ago
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Simple examples, but the effect of the ever smaller indeed changes the nature of atomic and this molecular interaction...

https://www.nano.gov/nanotech-101/special

Adam Malofsky, PhD
12 days ago

Have some input?