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What do consumers want from medical IoT?

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The tech, health care and medtech/life sciences communities (and investors) see great promise in the application of IoT to medical services. A recent survey of health care providers identifed their top three desires as access to data (bi-lateral to include patients), security of data, and coordination of data. All of these are commercial and IT oriented.

What do people (as consumers and patients) want? More health tech? Better health tech? Something else?

Healtcare Informatics and Systems
Health
IOT & big data
Robert McCray
more than 1 month ago

11 answers

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The IoT world of medical devices includes a broad range of topics, patient centered technologies such as wearables, software based technologies such as those used for patient compliance and data collection and monitoring, and those that include medical device to device communication, among others. An area that would be ripe for emmediate commercial application and customer value (patient, physician, nurse, caregiver) would be the ability of all of the devices in a given space communicating to one another. Example: in a typical OR you may find many different suppliers of medical devices. Each of them may come with their own measurement system, require an associate to monitor an outcome, and to acuate another device made by a seperate manufacturer that is monitored by a seperate device. There is a potential here for failure an and opportunity for IoT. What is needed is a consolidated industry effort to develop communication protocols to avoid the scenario above and risks to the patient. IoT would be the vehicle.

Marko Krutyholowa
19 days ago
0

Patients in the future are going to demand more personalized healthcare in all fields.
Everyone knows that no two people are similiar and big data machine learning solutions have started to bring personalized medicine to the forefront. This is just going to increase and rightfully so. Patients don't really care how this is done just as long as it is provided to them in a timely manner.

Rani (Ron) Shifron
more than 1 month ago
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It is true, advancements in healthcare tech is making great leaps forward, but as we develop the IoT health advancements that we not loose sight that patients still want to be treated like humans. Thus why Home Health and personalized care are the big buzzwords in health.

Secondly, patients want their lifestyle to stay near normal (proximity, ease of use, time-saving). Patients don't want their illness to define their life, so health IoT needs to be able to simplify, reduce down time and provide convient solutions.

Third, they want coordination of care (CoC) as it pertains to lifestlye. Ideally CoC improves medication managment, reduces oversight of other ailments, and tests results. Securing the health data is a big part of CoC as it allows for the physicians to see the patient from a whole scope. It also could help with compliance (patient to physician - physician to physician, patient to provider, provider to physician)

Kim Hernandez Kuch
more than 1 month ago
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Better outcomes for the same cost. Easy way to incorporate treatments in their life style. More DIY treatments and ownership of their own health. Easy access to the doctors without having to go in each and every other time.

Pavan Singh
more than 1 month ago
0

From medical IoT patients want:

  1. Convenience - IoT must increase access to services in a convenient way in terms of location and promptness of services.
  2. Transparency – Iot must facilitate communicating the cost of services and physician reputation in a clear and transparent manner.
Nilsa Guerrero-Mahon
more than 1 month ago
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I agree with Kim that patients (or rather people) do not want their diseases or sicknesses to define their life, that is solutions that prompt when something needs to be done VS constant relay of information when trying to life your life. Creating tools that people can be motivated and do for themselves.

That said, when faced with a catostrophic illness a way to get sound, scientific information that is easy to understand is so important in the age of the ePatient. We have so much information streaming from so many different sources, how do patients know which information to pay attention to that can help in shared decision-making with their doctors? This can include research, clinical trials, cost of services, treatment options, etc.

Vera Rulon
more than 1 month ago
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IoT will bring huge benefits to patients, cargivers, and phsycians dealing with chronic conditions. Generally, people with chronic conditions of hypertension, diabetes, and the like see their physician 1-2 times per month. ...and those are the only times that the physician is able to collect a data sample and feedback from the patient that he/she has been adherent to the prescribed plan (eat better, take X-med 2x daily, etc). But imagine integrating a wifi scale (Withings for example) into the equation that would allow the physician to see a history of daily weight fluctuations; or a check-in via simple "Alexa, I took my morning meds" that would allow easy tracking and near-immediate behavior intervention when someone forgets/strays from the course. A clear integration of the the data points from all of these current disparate tools (and perhaps a standard/certification on data quality) aggregated into a care plan could make healthcare very affordable and easy to stay on course.

Matthew Martin
more than 1 month ago
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Agree with much of the others regarding consumer wants. Consumers also bear a greater financial stake in healthcare and looking for "value" from their perspective now--not just from physician, hospital or pharmacist perspective. This will be challening to manufacturers to adapt their value proposition from clinical trials done for FDA approval along with 3rd party payers who have singularly been focused on economic issues. Unfortunately for 3rd parties, they pushed too far and have become a big part of the problem today. Consumers and Plan Sponsors are retaking some momentum through law suits or transformative contracting for plan administrative services. That along with anticipated disruption in typical supply chains today could lead to greater accessibility for consumers and new financial methods to address the cost of care.

Randy Vogenberg, PhD
more than 1 month ago
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Consolidated industry effort would go along way in making change happen to achieve good with patients.

Randy Vogenberg, PhD
19 days ago
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A customer centric with empathy culture in healthcare organizations will continue driving innovations. A promising capability for healthcare is Natural Language Recognition/Processing (NPL). Using effective NPL customer interfacing methods/ techniques and analytics customers and health care providers can achieve reliability, more direct connection, improve experience and reduce inefficient steps/processing. Hardware (batteries, storage capacity, signal transmission, weight, wearable properties....) workflows, systems security will need to continue improvements.

Norma H. Antuñano
18 days ago
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Complete health history and medication irrespective of which clinic, which doc we visted in what time and for what reason.
Transparency and Trust that information is not shared with illegal people around the globe.
Integrity that the data is correct
AI recommendations to improve on behavior, habits etc basis past historical medical data and medication

Piyush Manocha
14 days ago

Have some input?